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International Gap Junction Conference 2013

Join us in Charleston, South Carolina, United States.
The city boasts rich historical flavor and architecture, world-class cuisine
and unspoiled beaches. Charleston is consistently ranked by Conde' Nast
as one of the "must see" destinations in the United States.

The meeting will be held at the historic Francis Marion Hotel.
WELCOMECHARLESTONFRANCIS MARION HOTEL

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Program Committee
NAME:  Glenn I. Fishman

AFFILIATION:
  New York University School of Medicine, USA

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab studies cardiac electrophysiology and mechanisms of arrhythmias.  We are particularly interested in studies of cardiac conduction system development and disease, as well as gap junction remodeling and disease.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Steven Poelzing

AFFILIATION:
  University of Utah, USA

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab is interested in the mechanisms of electrical impulse formation and failure in the heart.  In particular, we seek to understand how cellular coupling through gap junctions and the extracellular matrix mediates the electrical spread of propagation.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Matthias M. Falk

AFFILIATION:
  Lehigh University, USA

RESEARCH INTERESTS:
  Of particular interest to me are processes related to protein biosynthesis, intracellular trafficking, the assembly of multi-protein complexes, and how cells in a multi-cellular organism communicate with each other. We use molecular biology, biochemistry, and in particular live-cell imaging approaches to investigate how cells regulate and modulate gap junction mediated direct cell-cell communication (GJIC), as well as physical cell-cell adhesion.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Hung-I Yeh

AFFILIATION: 
Mackay Medical College, Taiwan

RESEARCH INTEREST: 
My lab is interested in the role of gap junction and connexin in human cardiovascular disease.  In particular, in atherogenesis and arrhythmogenesis.  Currently we examine connexins in regulation of both native cardiovascular cells and circulating progenitor cells.

PUBMED LINK
NAME: Silvia Penuela

AFFILIATION:
University of Western Ontario, Canada

RESEARCH INTEREST:
My research focuses on the characterization of pannexin channels in health and disease.  We are currently studying the role of pannexins in skin differentiation and malignant transformation, as well as their regulation of cartilage and bone development.

PUBMED LINK

NAME:
  Joëlle Amedee Vilamitjana

AFFILIATION: 
University of Bordeaux, Inserm U1026, France

RESEARCH INTEREST: 
My lab is interested in strategies for improving tissue regeneration of bone and vessels with the help of human adult stem cells associated with three dimensional matrices. The cell to cell communication plays a key role in the mechanisms of tissue regeneration. In particular, we are focused on the  cocultures of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells in matrices for increasing both osteogenesis and vascularization of tissues produced in 3D. The role for connexins (Cx), mainly Cx43, and cadherins in mediating osteogenesis and vascularization are particularly targeted in our research.

PUBMED LINK

 
NAME:  Steffany Bennett

AFFILIATION:
  University of Ottawa, Canada

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My laboratory studies the role connexins and pannexins play in adult neurogenesis, gliogenesis, central nervous system (CNS) injury, and CNS repair.  In particular, we focus on modulating the repertoire of connexin/pannexins expressed by CNS cells and/or their channel-dependent and channel-independent functions to reduce cell loss and direct appropriate cell replacement.

PUBMED LINK

NAME:  Roger Thompson

AFFILIATION:
  University of Calgary, Canada

RESEARCH INTEREST: 
My lab is interested in the physiology and pathophysiology of pannexin-1 in the brain.  We are exploring the roles of pannexin in neuronal death during stroke and in synaptic physiology.

PUBMED LINK

NAME:  Brenda Kwak

AFFILIATION:
  University of Geneva Medical School, Switzerland

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab is interested in the function of connexins in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.  In particular, we focus on the regulation of connexins by shear stress and role of connexins in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, thrombosis and reperfusion injury.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Viviana M. Berthoud

AFFILIATION:
  University of Chicago, USA

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  I am interested in many aspects of the regulation of gap junctions.  The main focus of my research is on the mechanisms by which mutant lens connexins lead to cataract formation. 

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Cor de Wit

AFFILIATION:
  Universität zu Lübeck, Germany

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab studies intercellular communication in the blood vessel wall. We are focused on identifying connexins that allow either longitudinal (along the veesel) or transversal (from the endothelium to the smooth muscle) communication using mice that lack different connexins and studying their vessel function by intravital microscopy.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Luc Leybaert

AFFILIATION:
Ghent University, Belgium

RESEARCH INTEREST:
My lab is interested in the role of connexin and pannexin channels in cell death communication, calcium waves/oscillations, cardiomyocyte function/dysfunction and blood-brain barrier regulation. We have specific focus on hemichannels.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Masahito Oyamada

AFFILIATION:
  Fuji Women's University, Japan

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab is interested in the interaction of nutrition with connexin expression.  In particular, we are focused on the epigenetic regulation of connexins in various organs under low/high nutrient conditions.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Robin Shaw

AFFILIATION:
  University of California-San Francisco, USA

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  My lab is interested in the trafficking of cardiac gap junction proteins to the plasma membrane.  In particular, we are focused on how Cx43 based channels use the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton to arrive at gap junctions, and how they are subsequently removed.

PUBMED LINK
NAME:  Peter R. Brink

AFFILIATION:
  Stony Brook University, USA

RESEARCH INTEREST:
  Research Interests: My lab has focused on the delivery of gene products in stem cells to target cells both in vivo and in vitro where delivery is mediated by gap junctions.  We use a combination of methods to assess delivery viability including dual whole cell patch clamp, FACS sorting, Gene Chip analysis and proteomics. Examples of gene products are currents generated by membrane channels expressed in stem cells that then flow into target cells or the production of siRNAs to silence genes in target cells.

PUBMED LINK